Rick Parker/Li Daiguo & ScottClarkOther4tet @ Balliceaux

Join us for a special night of music, on Wednesday August 3rd, as we welcome the duo of Brooklyn’s Rick Parker and China’s Li Daiguo to Richmond for a great night of music at Balliceaux. The ScottClarkOther4tet will be opeing (featuring Cameron Ralston, Bob Miller, Alan Parker and Scott Clark).
Doors open at 9:30 and the show is free….
Balliceaux: 203 N. Lombardy St Richmond, VA 23220

Read more about Rick and Li below…they are touing in support of their new record and this is really something that you don’t want to miss. (you can hear a sample of what they do here…..https://youtu.be/yayQMF6LyeU)

ABOUT LI DAIGUO AND RICK PARKER
Sounds of the trombone, cello, pipa human voice and a variety of electronic remedies are conjured to form the psychoacoustic duo of Brooklyn’s Rick Parker and China’s Li Daiguo. “The sounds that the two create together are uncategorizable, a fluid blend of past and future, traditional and modern. They move from the ambient to the abstract, with folk-like acoustics colliding strangely with sci-fi electronics.” (Shaun Brady). With performances and recording sessions over the last 2 years in both NYC and Dali, a small city in southwest China, Parker and Li will release their debut record, Free World Music, on Brooklyn’s eleven2eleven record label in June 2016.

Their unlikely collaboration began in 2014 with Parker’s visit to Li’s current hometown of Dali where they performed and recorded. Later that fall, Li travelled to NYC where they spent another day in the recording studio and performed concerts at Manhattan Inn and Trans-Pecos presented by Lucas Ligeti’s Pigeon Culture. Their performance in Philadelphia presented by Fire Museum was also named a 2014 Best Performance in Philadelphia by Ken Weiss in Cadence Magazine. In the summer of 2015, they were invited to take part in a week long composition residency at COART in Lijiang, China which culminated in a concert of the music they created together during that week.

Both musicians have shaped their own successful careers on their own. Li Daiguo is a major figure in the experimental traditional music world in China and abroad. The multi-instrumentalist has performed solo concerts on cello, pipa, throat singing and beat boxing at Paris Cite De La Musique, Sonic Protest Festival France, Culturescapes Arts Festival in Switzerland, World Sacred Spirits Festival in India as well as festivals all over China. He has also composed for the Guangzhou Modern Dance company, Guangzhou Ballet company, Nobu Khan Malaysian Butoh Dance festival and has released numerous recordings on his own.

Combining jazz, experimental, electronic and rock, Rick Parker casts a broad net with his trombone playing augmented by electronics and synthesizers. His music has been described as “an expressive new-breed fusion, informed by a few generations of downtown experimentation.” Nate Chinen, New York Times. He leads/co-leads several groups including: jazz quintet, the Rick Parker Collective; Little Worlds a trio dedicated to the performance of Bela Bartok’s Mikrokosmos and 9 Volt with Eyal Maoz. These groups have 5 releases on labels including OutNow Recordings, Fresh Sound New Talent and eleven2eleven. Parker has worked with a large cross section of notable musicians including Tim Berne, Mingus Big Band, Charli Persip, Frank Lacy, Ravish Momin’s Tarana, Super Hi-Fi, Tim Kuhl, Beninghove’s Hangmen, hip hop legends the Wu Tang Clan, Ghostface Killah, DMC and mexican pop stars Ximena Sariñana and Natalia LaFourcade.

ScottClark4tet Kennedy Center Video

Screen Shot 2016-03-07 at 1.08.26 PM

On February 24, the ScottClark4tet played at the Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts as part of their Millennium Stage series.  The concert was streamed live and is now on their website as part of their archive (which has an amazing selection of videos to watch!).  I want to thank everyone that attended the concert that night and also thank you to everyone that watched online.

If you missed it, you can view the performance via this link http://www.kennedy-center.org/video/index/M6669 
This performance was of our suite “Bury My Heart” and is available on our new record by the same name.  You can purchase your copy on my site under the “music” tab (https://scottwclark.com/listen/) as well as on the Clean Feed Records website (https://cleanfeed-records.com/product/bury-my-heart/).  It is also available on your favorite online music service (amazon, iTunes etc).

Thank you for all of your support….more soon

Upcoming ScottClark4tet Concerts

 

SONY DSC
I am very excited to announce a few concerts that are coming up this month for my group the ScottClark4tet.

First we will be playing at Balliceaux, in Richmond, on February 16th with the Brian Jones Trio.  This concert will feature music from our new release on Clean Feed Records “Bury My Heart” as well as some other SC4tet standards. The Brian Jones Trio will be playing some Brian Jones originals, as well as some standards and a number of other things. Brian’s bands are always amazing and you will not want to miss this. (more info here)

The following week we have two great shows.  First on Wednesday, February 24th we will be performing the “Bury My Heart” suite at the Kennedy Center for Performing Arts Millennium Stage in Washington DC.  Doors for this concert open at 5:30pm and the show will start right at 6pm.  Concerts at the Millennium Stage are free and open to the public.

Nate Wooley Quintet bw by Ziga Koritnik
Then on Friday, February 26th we will be performing the suite again, but this time in NY at the ShapeShifter Lab.  This show is especially exciting as we will be sharing the stage with Nate Wooley and his Quintet.  Nate has been a big source of inspiration for me over many years and it was a great honor to have our new record released the same time, on the same label, as his Quintet’s new record.  If you’re not familiar with Nate’s music, or if you haven’t heard his latest record on Clean Feed Records, I truly encourage you to find out more info on him. (here is a great place to start http://natewooley.com) (also, more on Nate’s new record here Nate Wooley on Clean Feed Records and Nate Wooley Store)
This is an early show with sets at 7pm and 8:15pm $10.

Thank you all for your support and we hope to see you at one of these shows….

Tuesday, February 16th
ScottClark4tet & Brian Jones Trio @ Balliceaux
203 N. Lombardy St Richmond, VA
9pm $5

Wednesday, February 24th
ScottClark4tet @ Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts Millennium Stage
2700 F St NW, Washington, DC 20566
6pm Free

Friday, February 26th
ScottClark4tet & Nate Wooley Quintet @ ShapeShifter Lab
18 Whitwell Pl, Brooklyn, NY 11215
7pm & 8:15pm $10

(If you haven’t picked up your copy of our new record…you can do so here https://scottwclark.com/listen/ or on the previous post below)

ScottClark4tet “Bury My Heart” on Clean Feed Records Nov. 3rd

ScottClark4tet BuryMyHeart cover CF 347

I am very excited to announce that the new ScottClark4tet record, “Bury My Heart”, will be released on Clean Feed Records on November 3rd.  As some of you may know, I have been working on this suite of music for quite some time and I am really looking forward to sharing this work with everyone.  The music is inspired by my research into my own ancestry as well as certain events from Native American history.  We will be celebrating with a release show in Richmond on November 18th at Balliceaux.  The show will be free and we’ll have plenty of albums for you.

ScottClark4tet: Bury My Heart
1) Broken Treaties
2) Wounded Knee
3) Little Crow’s War
4) Big Horn
5) Sand Creek

6) Remembrance

ScottClark4tet:
Cameron Ralston- bass
Jason Scott- saxophone
Bob Miller- trumpet

Scott Clark- drums

Featuring JC Kuhl -bass clarinet & Bryan Hooten- trombone on “Broken Treaties”


ScottClark4tet: “Bury My Heart”
The title of this recording isn’t a mere literary reference (to “Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee”, by Dee Brown). Just like the novel, the music inside is a tragic and soulful portrait of one of the darkest pages of human history and particularly the United States past (with effects continuing to present day): the Native-American genocide. Created by jazz drummer and composer Scott Clark, himself of Native-American descent, it has the form of a suite but none of its formal, classical, aspects. The approach is irreverent, visceral, raw and urgent, further developing the unique style of this incredible musician coming from the vibrant scene of Richmond, Virginia. This is downbeat music, very much connecting to the inner feeling of that musical language called jazz, and we do feel the pain, but there’s no negativity on it. As Brian Edward Jones writes in the liner notes, remembering Albert Ayler, «music is the healing force of the universe». And what heals us is the freshness, the novelty and the creativity of this magnificent opus. Here is a masterpiece, not just another jazz album.

Clean Feed Records


Some information on the songs and what inspired them.

Broken Treaties
It is estimated that there have been over 500 treaties entered into with Native Americans by the United States.  It is also estimated that of those 500 treaties, nearly all of them were broken at some point in their history.  Many times, the violation of these treaties led to most of the hostilities that erupted between Native Americans and the white settlers that the treaties were with.

Wounded Knee
On December 29, the U.S. Army’s 7th Cavalry surrounded a band of Ghost Dancers under Big Foot, a Lakota Sioux chief, near Wounded Knee Creek and demanded they surrender their weapons. As that was happening, a fight broke out between an Indian and a U.S. soldier and a shot was fired, although it’s unclear from which side. A brutal massacre followed, in which it’s estimated 150 Indians were killed (some historians put this number at twice as high), nearly half of them women and children. The cavalry lost 25 men.

The conflict at Wounded Knee was originally referred to as a battle, but in reality it was a tragic and avoidable massacre. Surrounded by heavily armed troops, it’s unlikely that Big Foot’s band would have intentionally started a fight. Some historians speculate that the soldiers of the 7th Cavalry were deliberately taking revenge for the regiment’s defeat at Little Bighorn in 1876. Whatever the motives, the massacre ended the Ghost Dance movement and was the last major confrontation in America’s deadly war against the Plains Indians.
(*history.com staff http://www.history.com/topics/native-american-history/wounded-knee)

Little Crow’s War
Throughout the late 1850s, treaty violations by the United States and late or unfair annuity payments by Indian agents caused increasing hunger and hardship among the Dakota. Traders with the Dakota previously had demanded that the government give the annuity payments directly to them (introducing the possibility of unfair dealing between the agents and the traders to the exclusion of the Dakota). In mid-1862, the Dakota (led by Little Crow, Thaóyate Dúta) demanded the annuities directly from their agent, Thomas J. Galbraith. The traders refused to provide any more supplies on credit under those conditions, and negotiations reached an impasse.

On August 17, 1862, one young Dakota with a hunting party of three others killed five settlers while on a hunting expedition. That night a council of Dakota decided to attack settlements throughout the Minnesota River valley to try to drive whites out of the area. There has never been an official report on the number of settlers killed, although in Abraham Lincoln’s second annual address, he noted that not less than 800 men, women, and children had died.Over the next several months, continued battles pitting the Dakota against settlers and later, the United States Army, ended with the surrender of most of the Dakota bands. By late December 1862, soldiers had taken captive more than a thousand Dakota, who were interned in jails in Minnesota. After trials and sentencing, 38 Dakota were hanged on December 26, 1862, in the largest one-day execution in American history. In April 1863, the rest of the Dakota were expelled from Minnesota to Nebraska and South Dakota. The United States Congress abolished their reservations.
(*Wikipedia contributors. “Dakota War of 1862.” Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia)

Big Horn
At mid-day on June 25, Custer’s 600 men entered the Little Bighorn Valley. Among the Native Americans, word quickly spread of the impending attack. The older Sitting Bull rallied the warriors and saw to the safety of the women and children, while Crazy Horse set off with a large force to meet the attackers head on. Despite Custer’s desperate attempts to regroup his men, they were quickly overwhelmed. Custer and some 200 men in his battalion were attacked by as many as 3,000 Native Americans; within an hour, Custer and all of his soldiers were dead.

The Battle of the Little Bighorn, also called Custer’s Last Stand, marked the most decisive Native American victory and the worst U.S. Army defeat in the long Plains Indian War. The demise of Custer and his men outraged many white Americans and confirmed their image of the Indians as wild and bloodthirsty. Meanwhile, the U.S. government increased its efforts to subdue the tribes. Within five years, almost all of the Sioux and Cheyenne would be confined to reservations.
(*history.com staff http://www.history.com/topics/native-american-history/battle-of-the-little-bighorn)

Sand Creek
At dawn on November 29, 1864, approximately 675 U.S. volunteer soldiers commanded by Colonel John M. Chivington attacked a village of about 700 Cheyenne and Arapaho Indians along Sand Creek in southeastern Colorado Territory. Using small arms and howitzer fire, the troops drove the people out of their camp. While many managed to escape the initial onslaught, others, particularly non-combatant women, children, and the elderly fled into and up the bottom of the dry stream bed. The soldiers followed, shooting at them as they struggled through the sandy earth. At a point several hundred yards above the village, the women and children frantically excavated pits and trenches along either side of the streambed to protect themselves. Some adult men attempted to hold back the Army with whatever weapons they had managed to retrieve from the camp, and at several places along Sand Creek the soldiers shot the people from opposite banks and brought forward the howitzers to blast them from their improvised defenses. Over the course of eight hours the troops killed around 200 Cheyenne and Arapaho people composed mostly of women, children, and the elderly. During the afternoon and following day, the soldiers wandered over the field committing atrocities on the dead before departing the scene on December 1 to resume campaigning.
(National Park Service  http://www.nps.gov/sand/historyculture/index.htm)

Remembrance
Much of what we consider the “history” of Native Americans is still being felt to this day.  There are still fights over land rights at Wounded Knee, there are still people fighting to have the United States honor treaties that were entered into many years ago, there are still conflicts about how the upcoming Sand Creek Massacre anniversary is being portrayed and there still remains fallout over the Dakota Wars and their aftermath.  There are still many conflicts and issues that exist on reservations today including extreme poverty, illness, little or no access to health care etc.  However, despite what would at first appear to be all negative stories, there are many hopeful ones as well.  Native culture remains vibrant and efforts to bring back native languages are spreading throughout the country.  There are many tribes that are continuing efforts to reclaim land that was lost and more awareness is being spread to the modern day reality of many Native Americans.  It’s important to remember the past and see how it informs our present.  It’s also important to see the beauty that exists in Native American culture and to help focus on the positives that do exist today.

C&C Drums

C&C

I am very excited to be working with C&C Drums.  Even before hearing one of their sets, I read their “mission statement” and knew that it was a set that I would love to play.  After hearing many drummers play C&C drums, in many different contexts, I knew that they were going to be the set that would let me be able to play anything I could want.  Once I had the chance to play one of their sets, all that I thought about them was true.  They make great drums.
Now getting to work with them, having ordered my own set and having had the chance to talk with people at the company personally…I can say that I feel there is no better drum company in the world.  I am thankful for this opportunity and I hope that you’ll take the time to check out their drums and learn more about them as a company.  Also, a very special thank you to Natalie Prass and her team for helping me realize this dream.

From C&C’s website
“C&C Drum Co. is a small, independent company based in Gladstone, Missouri. We are comprised of musicians and craftsmen who share a common bond: the love of music. This bond connects us to our drums and the people who play them. We’ve never tried to be the flavor of the moment or cater to the latest whim. Our goal has always been to build something of lasting value. We are dedicated to making the best drums we possibly can—drums that will outlive us to become a legacy.”

http://www.candccustomdrums.com
Twitter: @CCDrumco
Instagram: @ccdrumco

You can hear some of our performances on the following links:
https://vid.me/9kTD/natalie-prass-why-don-t-you-believe-in-me-later
https://vid.me/rvHR

November 29, 1864

images
Today marks the 150th anniversary of the Sand Creek Massacre.  I hope that we will all take a moment to read some of what happened, to reflect on what it meant to us as a nation then and on what this event continues to say about us as a nation today.  Without too much editorializing, I have posted a handful of links below that you can explore.

http://indiancountrytodaymedianetwork.com/2014/11/29/native-history-ways-remember-sand-creek-150th-anniversary-158029

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/11/28/opinion/remember-the-sand-creek-massacre.html?_r=1

http://www.smithsonianmag.com/history/horrific-sand-creek-massacre-will-be-forgotten-no-more-180953403/?no-ist

http://indiancountrytodaymedianetwork.com/2014/11/24/150th-anniversary-sand-creek-massacre-remembrance-events-157774

http://indiancountrytodaymedianetwork.com:81/2014/11/25/6-insights-people-and-times-sand-creek-massacre-158012

http://indiancountrytodaymedianetwork.com/2014/11/27/6-more-insights-people-and-times-sand-creek-massacre-158017

http://indiancountrytodaymedianetwork.com/2014/11/14/sand-creek-massacre-8-hours-changed-great-plains-forever-157775

http://www.denverpost.com/opinion/ci_26985185/colorados-land-grab?source=infinite

http://inewsnetwork.org/2014/11/26/rocky-mountain-pbs-documentary-commerates-sand-creek-massacre/

http://indiancountrytodaymedianetwork.com/2014/11/28/what-led-sand-creek-massacre-check-out-timeline-158027

http://www.nps.gov/sand/historyculture/upload/Combined-Letters-with-Sign-2.pdf

http://www.summitdaily.com/news/regional/13988239-113/creek-sand-colorado-chivington

http://www.9news.com/story/news/local/2014/11/28/sand-creek-massacre-150-years-later/19602625/

http://sandcreekmassacre.net/witness-accounts/

http://www.pbs.org/weta/thewest/resources/archives/four/sandcrk.htm

A petition to have the name of Chivington, CO changed….
https://www.change.org/p/senator-larry-crowder-change-the-name-of-chivington-colorado

My thoughts are with the people that are still feeling the repercussions of this tragedy.  My hope is that by continuing to shine light on this story, more people will gain awareness and work to affect real/lasting change in the lives of all people around the world.

more soon…..

 

Premier of “Bury My Heart” at VCU Oct. 30th

photo by Lauren Serpa

photo by Lauren Serpa

I am excited to announce that on Thursday, October 30th, 2014, the ScottClark4tet, will be premiering a new work that I have written called “Bury My Heart”.  I have been writing and researching this piece for quite some time and I look forward to debuting it at Virginia Commonwealth University.

“Bury My Heart” comes from a journey of self-discovery into my own ancestry and the profound impact that reading and studying the history of Native Americans has had on my life. Many years ago I began researching my family’s Native American ancestry and the history of the many tribes of North America. The way I viewed life and nature had always intrigued me; and when I began to discover my own Native American background, those views led me to intensify my research.

One of the first books that opened my eyes to these events in the history of Native Americans was Dee Brown’s Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee. (Subsequent books that had profound impacts on me included The Sand Creek Massacre by Stan Hoig, The Killing of Crazy Horse by Thomas Powers, and Trail of Tears by John Ehle and many others). The events described in these books sent me on a path of discovery and research that has inspired the songs contained in this suite of music.

Of all the events described in these books, the one that has had the biggest impact on me is the Sand Creek Massacre, in which a village of peaceful Cheyenne and Arapaho were attacked and over 100 men, women and children were killed. November 29, 2014 will mark the 150th anniversary of the Sand Creek Massacre. We are premiering this music, at VCU, as a remembrance of one of the most tragic days in American history. The history of so many Native American tribes goes completely untaught in our society. One of my hopes is that through this music, and the stories behind the music, I can do a small part to reach others who will be inspired to look further into the histories, and present-day realities, of so many tribes in North America.

I hope that you will be able to join us for this night of music…and we look forward to sharing the music with you.

Thursday October 30th, 2014
8pm 
Admission is Free and open to the public 
Vlahcevic Concert Hall,
W. E. Singleton Center for the Performing Arts
922 Park Avenue
Richmond, Virginia 23284-2004

you can see a small preview of the music from our performance on Virginia This Morning via the link below
http://wtvr.com/2014/10/24/celebrate-your-friday-with-two-jazz-numbers-by-the-scott-clark-4tet/

also on 10/29 you can hear an interview and performance of some of the music from the suite on WCVE FM 88.9 NPR starting at 7pm.  (http://ideastations.org/radio)

https://www.facebook.com/events/1476847545873294/?ref=br_tf

This concert is co-sponsored by VCU Jazz (http://arts.vcu.edu/music/events/) and the Office of Multicultural Student Affairs (<www.omsa.vcu.edu>) in anticipation of Native American History Month (November) and of the 150th anniversary of the Sand Creek Massacre (November 29).

The ScottClark4tet is:
Cameron Ralston-bass
Bob Miller-trumpet
Jason Scott-saxophone
Scott Clark-drums

thank you for your support….
more soon………

design by Cary Ralston

 

New Band (Parallax) with Jeb Bishop, Bryan Hooten, Cameron Ralston, Bob Miller, Jason Scott and myself

Parallax

I’m really excited to announce a new group called Parallax made up of many great Richmond musicians and the great trombonist Jeb Bishop from North Carolina.  The group features Cameron Ralston-bass, Jason Scott-saxophone, Bob Miller-trumpet, Bryan Hooten-trombone, Jeb Bishop-trombone and myself on drums.  We will be playing our first show on Tuesday August 12 at Balliceaux in Richmond, VA.  The show starts at 9:30pm and it’s free.
I hope that you’ll join us for a great night of new music featuring compositions by Jeb Bishop and myself.

There will be a special set with my group the ScottClark4tet to open the night.

Thank you to everyone for your support…and I hope to see you there

Parallax w/ScottClark4tet
Tuesday August 12th
Balliceaux
203 N Lombardy St, Richmond, VA 23220
9:30pm Free

more soon…..

New Recording….coming soon

 

image © ScottClark

image © ScottClark

I’m very excited to be going into the studio this week to record some music that my band (ScottClark4tet) and I have been working on for quite some time now.  The music was inspired in part by some of the events described in Dee Brown’s book “Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee” as well as many other books describing the history of Native Americans, and their dealings with white settlers and politicians.  This music has been a great source of inspiration to me, and the musicians in the band have really made this music come to life over the past few months.  I am really looking forward to recording this music and I am planning for debut of the suite sometime this November.

On November 29th of this year, there will be a remembrance of  the Sand Creek Massacre (one of the main events that inspired this music and spawned much of my personal study on the subject).  It is described by the National Parks Service as “…one of the most emotionally charged and controversial events in American history, a tragedy reflective of its time and place.”  

More from the National Parks Service website about Sand Creek (http://www.nps.gov/sand/historyculture/index.htm)
     “At dawn on November 29, 1864, approximately 675 U.S. volunteer soldiers commanded by Colonel John M. Chivington attacked a village of about 700 Cheyenne and Arapaho Indians along Sand Creek in southeastern Colorado Territory. Using small arms and howitzer fire, the troops drove the people out of their camp. While many managed to escape the initial onslaught, others, particularly noncombatant women, children, and the elderly fled into and up the bottom of the dry stream bed. The soldiers followed, shooting at them as they struggled through the sandy earth. At a point several hundred yards above the village, the women and children frantically excavated pits and trenches along either side of the streambed to protect themselves. Some adult men attempted to hold back the Army with whatever weapons they had managed to retrieve from the camp, and at several places along Sand Creek the soldiers shot the people from opposite banks and brought forward the howitzers to blast them from their improvised defenses. Over the course of eight hours the troops killed around 200 Cheyenne and Arapaho people composed mostly of women, children, and the elderly. During the afternoon and following day, the soldiers wandered over the field committing atrocities on the dead before departing the scene on December 1 to resume campaigning.

Since the barbarism of November 29, the Sand Creek Massacre maintains its station as one of the most emotionally charged and controversial events in American history, a tragedy reflective of its time and place. The background of the Sand Creek Massacre lay in a whirlwind of events and issues registered by the ongoing Civil War in the East and West; the overreactions by whites on the frontier to the 1862-63 Dakota uprising in Minnesota and its aftermath; the status of the various bands of Southern Cheyenne and Arapaho Indians relative to each other as well as other plains tribes; the constant undercurrent of threatened Confederate incursions; and the existing state of politics in Colorado including the intrigues of individual politicians in that territory. Perhaps most important, the seeds of the Sand Creek Massacre lay in the presence of two historically discordant cultures within a geographical area that both coveted for disparate reasons, an avoidable situation that resulted in tragedy.”

This music and these events don’t just exist in a vacuum.  Many of these topics still are being dealt with today.  From the debate over the Washington Redskins team name (http://cnn.it/1vtPsZQ) (also, read the comment section to see more) to History Colorado’s (the Colorado Historical Society) dealing with the upcoming remembrance of the Sand Creek Massacre (http://bit.ly/1kivPyK) or to all of the many events happening in and around the Native American community (http://bit.ly/1sLRAYA) there is a lot going on right now.  I don’t claim to be an expert on all of the inner workings of what is happening now, or what has happened in the past.  I have however been deeply affected by what I have learned and how it informs my own life.  Through my research and through this music, I hope to share a part of my dealings with these subjects with as many people as I can.  I also know that this is just the beginning of a lifelong search for more knowledge and understanding.

I am very grateful to Spacebomb Studios for allowing us to record in their great studio and specifically to Trey Pollard, Matthew E. White, Pinson Chanselle, Cameron Ralston and the rest of the Spacebomb family for helping me to realize this recording. I look forward to sharing this music with as many people as possible and as soon as possible. Most importantly, I can not thank the guys in the band (Cameron Ralston, Bob Miller and Jason Scott) enough for being so giving of their time over the past few years….and also to everyone along the way for all of your support.  THANK YOU!!

more soon…..

Chicago shows

SONY DSC

I’m really excited to be heading to Chicago to play some music with some musicians that I’ve been a huge fan of for years.
To my friends in the Chicago area, I’d love to see you at these shows.

Thursday May 29
Elastic
2830 N. Milwaukee Ave, 2nd Fl
Chicago, IL
9:00pm
$8

Improvised Music Series

9 PM : STEIN/LONBERG-HOLM/CLARK
Richmond VA-based drummer Scott Clark makes a Chicago debut alongside two regulars on the improvised music scene.

Jason Stein – bass clarinet
Fred Lonberg-Holm – cello
Scott Clark – drums

10 PM : NICK BROSTE QUARTET
Trombonist Nick Broste presents the Elastic debut of his new working quartet.

Nick Broste – trombone
Ben Boye – piano
Anton Hatwich – bass
John Niekrasz – drums

– See more at: http://elasticarts.org/steinlonberg-holmclark-nick-broste-quartet/#sthash.jjkRn7t7.dpuf

Sunday June 1st 
Hungry Brain
2319 W Belmont Ave
Chicago, IL 60618

2 sets
10pm
$7

Keefe Jackson– tenor saxophone
Josh Berman– cornet
Jason Roebke– bass
Scott Clark- drums

Dave Rempis– alto saxophone
Jason Roebke- bass
Scott Clark- drums 

more soon…..